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Dr. rer. nat. Stephan Block

Physics

Stephan Block

Freie Universität Berlin

Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Organic Chemistry

Junior Research Group Leader, DFG Emmy-Noether-Programme

Address
Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Arnimallee 22
Room A.127
D-14195 Berlin
Fax
+49 30 838 460071
Homepage

Research Experience

Since 3/2016

Leader of the Junior Research Group “Bionanointerfaces” at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany.
Member of the Emmy Noether Programme of the German Research Foundation since 11.2017.

Quantification of multivalent virus-receptor interactions and their modification by addition of virus binding inhibitors. Development of new biophysical approaches, offering high data throughput and/or single-molecule resolution.
08/2013-02/2016

Post doctoral research associate in the lab of Prof. Dr. F. Höök („Biological Physics“), Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.

Application of single particle tracking, nanoplasmonically enhanced fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and microfluidics to quantify multivalent interactions
09/2011-07/2013

Post doctoral research associate in the lab of Dr. M. Delcea („Nanostructure Group“), ZIK HIKE, University Medicine Greifswald, Germany.

Biophysical characterization of proteins, protein complexes, and cells to study molecular fundamentals of autoimmune diseases.

07/2010-08/2011

Independent project leader, associated to the lab of Prof. Dr. C. A. Helm („Soft Matter and Biophysics“), Institute of Physics, University of Greifswald, Germany.

Development of a novel AFM approach at allows magnetic properties of single superparamagnetic nanoparticles to be quantified on the nm-scale.
08/2005-06/2010

PhD student in the lab of Prof. Dr. C. A. Helm („Soft Matter and Biophysics“), Institute of Physics, University of Greifswald, Germany.

Development of AFM approaches to determine the conformation of physisorbed polyelectrolytes from the measurement of surface forces.